Katie Lubarsky

katie_picI am a Masters student in the Donahue lab, and I am broadly interested in understanding the mechanisms that drive coral reef health, growth, and decay as a way to inform effective management decisions. In 2011, I received a Bachelors of Science in Marine Biology from UCLA where I studied the effects of nutrient and herbivory levels on algal defenses. Following graduation, I traveled to coastal Ecuador to study the effects of water quality on freshwater shrimp. Most recently, I spent a year in the Dominican Republic working on a coral gardening project aimed at restoring staghorn coral (Acropora cervicornis) and katie_workpicseveral other community conservation initiatives.

My current research focuses on the effect of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on the rates of coral growth and bioerosion in Maunalua Bay, Oahu.  I hypothesize that the nutrient-rich, low salinity groundwater will drive changes in water chemistry (namely pH), leading to spatial differences in calcification and bioerosion rates across the groundwater gradient. A more in-depth summary of my project can be found under the “Projects” tab.

During the course of my graduate work, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with various private research organizations. Most recently, I have travelled to the Northern Great Barrier Reef and the Chagos Archipelago as a fish surveyor with the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation. Earlier, I spent a week aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor as a marine mammal observer.

 

Publications:

1. Chan, A.Y., K. Lubarsky, K.A. Judy, and P. Fong (2012). Nutrient addition increases consumption rates of tropical algae with different initial palatabilities. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 465: 25-31.

2. Huang, B., K. Lubarsky, T. Teng, and D.T. Blumstein (2011). Take only pictures, leave only… fear? The effects of photography on the West Indian anole Anolis cristatellus. Current Zoology, 57: 77-82.